Long Island Firewood

Saturday, August 14, 2010



STACKING FIREWOOD ON LONG ISLAND


It may not be cold outside but now is the best time to stack your firewood properly for this Winter. Here are the main reasons why:

  • Long Island is very humid & firewood takes longer to dry here.

  • Incorrectly stacked firewood can attract insects & vermin.

  • Recently purchased "seasoned" firewood may need additional drying.

  • Firewood no longer dries when the temperature goes below 45 degrees.

  • You may find you do not have enough firewood for this upcoming season.





Long Island Humidity



The humidity on Long Island is usually very high during the warmest months of the Summer. That's a problem for drying firewood. The moisture in wood can only evaporate if it can be released into the atmosphere. When it is humid the moisture has no where to go and thus your firewood will dry much slower than you think. In drier climates firewood dries much faster than it does here on Long Island.



Insects and Rodents


Bugs and rodents love wood piles. Firewood warms up during the day and retains the heat well into the night. An undisturbed pile of firewood is an invitation to bugs, mice and even larger critters. Be sure to stack your firewood far away from your house. Bring a small pile closer to the house as you need it.



"Seasoned" Firewood


Okay, so you bought your firewood early this year. Good thinking. Only problem is that if it is Oak and has not been seasoned for over a year it will need more drying. Don't wait until the Winter to find out the wood is still wet. Use these hot Summer months to dry the would some more. Don't leave it in a heaping pile as it was delivered. Stack it so the sun and wind can do their job.



Firewood stops drying in the Winter


Once the temperature dips below 45 degrees you'll have to wait an eternity for hardwoods to dry. Remember, the wood retains both heat and cold. So those cold nights turn your firewood into ice cubes that will have little success warming up enough to dry during the moderate day time temperatures.



Don't get caught short


A pile of firewood usually takes up to 35% more space than a stack of firewood. Your unorganized pile may look like enough to get you through the Winter, but once you stack it you may be surprised that you have less than you thought.



Conclusion


Preparing your firewood in the Summer months will insure you have a Winter filled with toasty warm fires. Be sure to stack your wood early in the season. Place the wood in an area with plenty of wind and sun. Be sure the wood is up of the ground and alternate your stacking pattern to create airflow. Don't tarp or cover your stack unless the forecast in for lots of rain. The rain actually helps the wood season. Spend some time taking care of your firewood during the summer and you'll be glad you did when the cold weather arrives.




3 comments:

vance said...

One of the main benefits of using firewood as a source of fuel is that when it is produced from sustainable sources, such as managed plantations and coppiced woodland, it can be carbon neutral. That is the amount of carbon dioxide that is released from the burning of the wood is equal to the amount that is taken up by any replanting or regrowth that occurs in the forest from where the wood came. As a result there is no overall increase in the amount of carbon that is released into the atmosphere. And with carbon dioxide recognised as a major contributor to global warming, this is a definite bonus.
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Frederick Hwang said...

Wood is not a fossil fuel! Unlike fossil fuels, wood stock not just exhausting. Within a relatively short period of time is the "cultivation" of firewood should be realized that also have other social advantages.

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Lumber Jack said...

Nice blog. http://long-island-firewood.blogspot.in/

 

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